Emergency List
compiled off our Message Board



Author Topic: emergency list
ggaff
Junior Member
Member # 578

posted December 18, 2004 09:31 AM                     
Does anybody have a list of emergency gear they carry with them in the car? I live in the mountains and commute down the hill to go to work and want to put together a light weight pack with light weight "essentials."
Posts: 7 | From: Big Bear Lake, CA | Registered: Dec 2003  |  Logged: 24.205.124.50
anthracitic
Member
Member # 1181

posted December 18, 2004 10:13 AM                       
Under what conditions and circumstances do you envision using this pack?
Posts: 50 | From: Cody Wyoming | Registered: Nov 2004  |  Logged: 69.145.97.100
ggaff
Junior Member
Member # 578

posted December 18, 2004 10:20 AM                      
It could be cold and snowy conditions during the winter. During most of the year it would not be that extreme so this might be something that I throw a couple of extra items in during the winter. We have had fires, earthquakes and snow storms (sort of for So. Cal. mtns.) so I thought it would be wise to be more prepared.
Posts: 7 | From: Big Bear Lake, CA | Registered: Dec 2003  |  Logged: 24.205.124.50
anthracitic
Member
Member # 1181

posted December 18, 2004 11:00 AM                       
What do you want to accomplish with the pack?
In other words, what are your possible scenarios for using it?
I teach survival, and BOB's (bug-out bags) are an important part of this. One needs to try to imagine the situations in which they would be using the bag in order to be carrying usable stuff.

[ December 18, 2004, 11:01: Message edited by: anthracitic ]

Posts: 50 | From: Cody Wyoming | Registered: Nov 2004  |  Logged: 69.145.97.100
ggaff
Junior Member
Member # 578

posted December 18, 2004 02:17 PM                      
The pack is just a convenient way to accumulate, store and carry the items if there was an emergency. I have a fieldline daypack that I thought would be a good candidate for this since I use a spike camp and longhunter for hunting these days. The possible scenarios could include having to hike up the mountain if automobile traffic is close off (such as during the earthquake and recent fires). I work near L.A. and if there was some type of civil unrest (riots) or disaster, I might have to have some type of temporary survival supplies.

Wow, sounds like I live and work in a dangerous place.

[ December 18, 2004, 14:18: Message edited by: ggaff ]

Posts: 7 | From: Big Bear Lake, CA | Registered: Dec 2003  |  Logged: 24.205.124.50
Ralph
Member
Member # 273

posted December 18, 2004 03:33 PM                       
I live and mostly travel in the Adirondack region where it can be cold and wet a lot of the year. I carry a lot of stuff in the truck, probably more than most. I'm in the process of making a whole new set of load-bearing gear, and am revising the list of things I carry. I won't be able to get this done until after Christmas, so will post what I have later, more likely around the first of the year.

I have an S-10 pickup, plain cab, with a toneau cover over the bed. If I were buying one again I would get a club cab and a camper top. This is transportation, I don't use the truck for anything else. I also live in an apartment. These factors influence things I carry, which is why I mention them.

I carry a lot of my regular gear in the truck at all times. I have to store the stuff somewhere and it might as well be with me instead of in a closet at home. I also equip myself for two people. The cab seats two, and I sometimes have a companion without their own gear on my treks. This way I can offer a degree of hospitality to any companion I happen to have with me.

I hang a set of pockets on the back wall of the cab, and another set in back of the bench seat. I'm also rebuilding those in the form of black cordura faced with PALS grids instead of sewn-in pockets. My intention is to hang gear pouches instead of pockets. There is a small shelf available in back of the seat with a roughly triangular space above.

In the cab I store expensive/delicate/"sensitive" stuff as well as things I use regularly and want ready to hand. These include a copper-blade ice-scraper/snow brush, a French army alpine snow shovel, a Glock E-tool, an AR-7 .22 rifle, 2-magazines and about 250 rds ammo in pouches. The rifle, stored in its stock is also in a plain padded bag that does NOT look like a gun case. I also have a tool bag with multiblade screwdriver, set wrenches and other car-type tools, a solar/dynamo AM/FM radio/flashlight, and a charged up battery jumper/emergency light. Also a 12V tire inflator, jack and tire tools.

Norlund Camper axe, Sawvivor frame saw and spare blades, 1941-era Woodman's Pal, Cold Steel Recon Scout knife in sheath with pouch containing DMT fine/coarse diamond hone and a Gerber Sportsman's steel. I modified the sheath by replacing the belt hanger with a MOLLE hanger. I also usually have a smaller knife, Cold Steel's Pendleton Hunter.

A shoulder bag has some gear I carry in my pockets or on my trouser belt, including fire-making stuff, belt pouches with a Cold Steel large Clipmate folder, SOG Paratool with the extra blades installed, Victorinox Hunter knife, Schrade Pioneer trapper pattern and an old Case fishing knife. (What can I say? I like blades.) My old Recta compass, a 1917 watchcase compass I use for backup, and a mapcase with large scale local maps.

I have an M-2 type medic bag with a first aid/medical kit back there too. Also a small fire extinguisher, a tow strap and 50' of 7mm accesory cord. I also have an "Aussie Rope Winch" that acts as a come-along, hoist, and winch.

In the back of the truckbed, secured by a rail is an aviator kit bag with a set of clothing and footwear (all sized for me. Smaller and companion can borrow it, larger and they are SOL. Underwear, socks, shirt, trousers, an M1A issue aviator jacket, fleece sweater, cap, gloves, my old Goretex parka and so forth. Clothing is compressed in Space-Saver bags, waterproof and airtight. I also have a pair of boots and a pair of the USAF mukluks and liners as well as 2-pair of Swiss army snowshoes (compact, oak bearpaw type with simple harness and exposed hobnails as ice creepers.

I keep two packs on each side of the clothing bag. My pack, the larger, is on the driver side, companion pack is on the passenger side.

Originally, the packs were ALICE-medium (companion) and an extended version I made a few years ago (mine).

I'll be replacing these with Zulu-type packs I'm making this winter, along with pouches and pockets.

The packs contain a sleeping bag, pillow sack, sleep pad, square tarp tents, bug net, Peak 1 solo cooksets with Camp Heat and Sterno "Piggyback" stoves, Platypus water bottles. repair kit, firemaking kit, first aid kit, toilet kit. Toilet paper, emergency food bars and food accessory packs.

My usual clothing is generally heavy-duty stuff, boots, Goretex parka, gloves etc. and I usually have a pocket knife with me (Stockman pattern) and a small utility tool as a house key ring as well as an LED light/small knife as a car key ring. In addition I usually have either a S&W 317 .22 revolver &/or a .380 Colt Government on me. So I'm fairly well equipped just walking out the door.

My truck has a 20-gallon tank with about a 400 mile cruising range and I try to fill it before it gets below half.

As I said, I'm going to be rebuilding the whole package this winter. I'll post a more organized list when I finish that.

There is a fair amount of redundancy in all this, by design. The packs are "grab and go" and can standalone without most of the stuff in the cab.

What I'm aiming for is when I want to go canoeing, I just add the canoe & paddles, and some food and be good to go. I'm selling/giving away a lot of the odds and ends of gear I've accumulated over the years and trying to compress my stuff into a good assortment to do what I want to do.

Hunting rifles, shotguns, fishing gear and so forth I add as the need arises.

Posts: 244 | From: Upstate NY | Registered: Apr 2003  |  Logged: 170.215.216.149
Sawtooth
Member
Member # 610

posted December 18, 2004 05:52 PM                
ggaf,

Here's most of the items I carry around in my pickup (Ford F250 4X4, extended cab, long bed). I live in the Colorado Rockies (foothills), and most of my concerns are getting stranded in bad weather, or running off the road and having to hike out. In the summer when I'm not teaching school, I'm a wildland firefighter. So some of my tools are based on what I know works from that line of work.

Possibles Pouch (from my backpack):
(All stored in a Kifaru Large Pullout)
Garmin 12 Map GPS
Silva Type 26 Compass
Space Blanket
Area Map
Signal Mirror
Military Parachute Cord (50 ft.)
20 Matches in Waterproof Case plus a strip of striker material from an old box
Hot Hands Hand Warmers (5ea.)(El Cheapos from Wal-Mart)
Kifaru Meat Baggie
Large Heavy Duty Leaf Bag
Orange Survey Flagging (10 ft.), wadded up, wrapped with rubber band
Duct Tape (2”X3’)
Super Glue (.06 oz. tube)
Cabela’s Lens Pen (for cleaning optics, got it free with my last scope)
Fingernail Clippers
Eye Drops (1/6 oz. drip bottle) (I wear contacts…gotta have)
Gun Oil (1/2 oz. bottle)
Cleaning Patches (5 ea.)
Cleaning Patch holder for rod
Adapter for bore cleaning equipment
Fire starting sticks (5 ea.) (Another El Cheapo from Wal-Mart, but they WORK!)
Tent stakes (9 ea.)
AA batteries (4 ea.)
Pencil, 2”
Whistle/thermometer combo
Transparent Bic lighters (2 ea.)
Sharpening stone, fine, 1”X4”
Leatherman
Marble’s Custom 2003 Dall Deweese Knife

Sunglasses

Small tool box with all the basics for working on the truck in an emergency.
Tire chains
Jumper cables
One 20' log chain
Gas-powered portable winch (runs on a chain saw
engine)
Tire repair kit
Petzl Micro headlamp
Binoculars
12V air compressor
Cold weather clothing, Carhartt bibs, wool shirt,
winter parka, pac boots, etc. Heavier than my
usual lightweight backpacking clothing. Hey, I
don't have to carry it on my back, so who
cares?
Tubbs snowshoes/poles
Two Nalgene water bottles, full.
A little food, like energy bars, jerky, etc.
One roll of baling wire.
One roll of duct tape.
Hatchet
Short spade with D handle
Pulaski
Combi Tool (firefighting tool) Great for just
about any digging, grubbing, etc.
Fire Extinguisher
First Aid Kit large size.
1 million candlepower spotlight 12V/Cordless
Toilet Paper
Ancient, well used, Jack Wolfskin Verdon backpack.

I nearly always take my Model 4046 Smith and Wesson autoloader in .40 S&W. If I'm leaving to go for any type of hunt, then I will have my rifle of choice.

There may be more. I will just have to look under the back seat of the truck to check. But this is most of the stuff I carry all the time.

I never let either of my tanks get below 1/4 tank. I can get butt back from just about anywhere around here on that amount of diesel fuel. If I do run out, I'll just load up the pack and hoof it out.

I hope this helps!

PS: Because I'm also a firefighter, on call 24/7, our family has invested in a number of 2-way, FM radios, and we also purchased our own radio frequency and license. This venture was NOT cheap, but I can tell you we've used the system constantly for about 4 years. We have a base radio in our home, a mobile in each vehicle (including my truck) and one hand-held radio. Where we live you cannot depend on cell phones because of the deep canyons and remote areas.

[ December 18, 2004, 17:53: Message edited by: Sawtooth ]

Posts: 204 | From: Canon City, CO | Registered: Jan 2004  |  Logged: 66.82.9.60
anthracitic
Member
Member # 1181

posted December 18, 2004 05:55 PM                       
ggaff, what vehicle, and do you have a mountain bike?
Posts: 50 | From: Cody Wyoming | Registered: Nov 2004  |  Logged: 69.145.97.100
ggaff
Junior Member
Member # 578

posted December 18, 2004 06:11 PM
I have a toyota tacoma 4 x4 double cab with a shell on the back. No mountain bike but I would like to get one. My wife keeps telling me I have enough hobbies (still working on that one).
Posts: 7 | From: Big Bear Lake, CA | Registered: Dec 2003  |  Logged: 24.205.124.50
Ralph
Member
Member # 273

posted December 18, 2004 06:15 PM
Sawtooth, looking at your list I see a lot of stuff is virtually the same as mine. Some of the items you list I have in my repair kit (Superglue, duct tape, etc.)or elsewhere, some I just forgot to list.

I don't usually carry water in the winter (it freezes) but I do have a First Need filter and there is a lot of water around here, though it is best to filter it.

The radio is a good idea, but I have no one at home. I've been thinking about a cell phone for emergencies. We have the same problem with interference, though the bumps aren't as high as in your neck of the woods and there are cell phone antennas all over now.

BTW, any cell phone will work for 911 calls, you do not have to pay for the service. Federal law requires that 911 calls be put through no matter who makes them. Just be sure it is really a 911 emergency.

Posts: 244 | From: Upstate NY | Registered: Apr 2003  |  Logged: 170.215.216.58
anthracitic
Member
Member # 1181

posted December 18, 2004 06:48 PM                      
Okay.
The mountain bike question was to have plan B form of transport.
If you're serious about being prepared, I offer the following advice.
Get a copy of 'Six Ways in and Twelve Ways out'
Study it until you know it backwards and forwards
I recommend the following items in your pack for times other than cold weather.
This eq now becomes your BOB
3- 3M 8511 dust masks.
1 pr. dust tight goggles
One gallon distilled water in four containers
HTI bag
silnylon poncho
blizzardsystems bag
Serbu super shorty with sling
20 rds. 12ga. OO buckshot
100' glow in the dark 8mm line
good L.E.D. flashlight.
I like the C. Crane 3C cell exped. model
Estwing riggers axe (razor sharp)
Victorinox Workchamp
6 MetRx energy bars
6 bic lighters stashed around
black greasepaint
lt. wt. pile jacket and pants
pile hoodie
emergency cell phone battery extender
map-compass-gps (your choice of brand)
Caffeine tablets
1/8th inch braided nylon line 100'
small pot with cup type lid
ramen and teabags with honey packets
signal mirror with morse code on back
fox 40 whistle
lightweight leather work gloves
extra pair of sox
2 big bandannas
baby wipes
chapstick
hand sanitizer
roll of heaviest aluminum foil you can find {folded}
3 large leaf bags heaviest you can find
What kind of phsyical condition are you in?
How do you dress for work?

I'll follow this up with some extra gear rec.s for winter. chow call-
I'll also provide a link to a good first aid eq list

[ December 19, 2004, 16:58: Message edited by: anthracitic ]

Posts: 50 | From: Cody Wyoming | Registered: Nov 2004  |  Logged: 69.145.97.100
ggaff
Junior Member
Member # 578

posted December 18, 2004 06:59 PM                      
Great list.
I am in good physical condition
I dress business casual (button up shirt and dockers)
What are the caffein tablets for?

Posts: 7 | From: Big Bear Lake, CA | Registered: Dec 2003  |  Logged: 24.205.124.50
anthracitic
Member
Member # 1181

posted December 18, 2004 07:00 PM                       
first aid link
http://www.avweb.com/news/aeromed/181890-1.html
Add some form of wound irrigation device

Posts: 50 | From: Cody Wyoming | Registered: Nov 2004  |  Logged: 69.145.97.100
anthracitic
Member
Member # 1181

posted December 18, 2004 07:04 PM                       
If the poop hits the rotor, you may need to be awake and alert for an extended period. Good way to stave off exhaustion.
Posts: 50 | From: Cody Wyoming | Registered: Nov 2004  |  Logged: 69.145.97.100
Ed C
Member
Member # 81

posted December 18, 2004 07:41 PM                      
Gentlemen

Excellent subject keep it coming.

Sawtooth- good list sounds like what I carry in my truck box when I head out hunting. It is a reminder I need to put together something to have at all times. I didn't see hi-lift jack to go along with the winch. It has saved me many times.

anthracitic-What is a Serbu super shorty with sling? I am sure I want one if it is what propels the 20 rounds of 00 buck.

I must confess looking at these post I am driving around totally unprepared for anything.

Ed

Posts: 145 | From: Whidbey Island, Wa. | Registered: Jan 2003  |  Logged: 209.166.76.203
Sawtooth
Member
Member # 610

posted December 18, 2004 07:42 PM                          
PS: One more item. It took my old Peak 1 Apex II stove and one stainless 1.5 liter pot and they are in the truck.
Posts: 204 | From: Canon City, CO | Registered: Jan 2004  |  Logged: 66.82.9.16
Sawtooth
Member
Member # 610

posted December 18, 2004 07:44 PM                          
Ed,

I hear ya on the hi lift. I've never had one, but I know other guys who have pulled their fat out of the fire more than once with one of them. Getting a Jeep up in the air is one thing, jacking a 6,500 pound truck is another. But I'll bet it would still do a good job. Good point.

Posts: 204 | From: Canon City, CO | Registered: Jan 2004  |  Logged: 66.82.9.16
anthracitic
Member
Member # 1181

posted December 18, 2004 08:08 PM                       
Ed C
http://www.serbu.com/shorty.htm

Posts: 50 | From: Cody Wyoming | Registered: Nov 2004  |  Logged: 69.145.97.100
ggaff
Junior Member
Member # 578

posted December 18, 2004 08:32 PM                      
One of the sites I went to that sells the Serbu said it wasn't available in California so I may have to pass on that one.

[ December 18, 2004, 20:36: Message edited by: ggaff ]

Posts: 7 | From: Big Bear Lake, CA | Registered: Dec 2003  |  Logged: 24.205.124.50
anthracitic
Member
Member # 1181

posted December 18, 2004 09:04 PM                       
Additional gear for winter
nuwick candle
Orion 15 min. road flare
Winmore O.D tape
Lamilite poncho liner
3/4 length closed cell foam pad
A good pair of boots that are comfortable, and have room for wool hiking sox and liners.
This list makes the following assuptions.
That you are in reasonably good physical condition. A simple test: could you run a mile RIGHT NOW?
The EQ in this BOB would be used as a ditch bag, meaning you are A.leaving, B.not using, or C.abandoning your vehicle for any of a variety of reasons. This is a judgement call, and once one embarks on this choice, he is committed.
Make this choice carefully. Six and Twelve manual has much sage advice on when to and when not to do so.
With the eq listed, you can survive for at least three days in the climate you live in. This assumes you are not seriously injured. Some of this eq will assist you in getting out of an urban hostile environment on foot, and the rest will keep you alive and reasonably comfortable once you're out of populated areas.
Other assumptions are that you would have a cap, shoes that would serve to walk and run a fair distance in, sunglasses and cell phone on your person, or in your vehicle.

[ December 18, 2004, 21:18: Message edited by: anthracitic ]

Posts: 50 | From: Cody Wyoming | Registered: Nov 2004  |  Logged: 69.145.97.100
Steelworker
Member
Member # 736

posted December 18, 2004 10:29 PM                       
Wound irrigation: Zerowet Irrigation Syringe would be first on my list. If you don't have that, any of the larger syringes -- at least 10 cc; bigger is better -- you don't need the needle, just the syringe body. Third choice is a good 1 quart zip lock bag and a povidone swab (not the little inch sq. pads.). Put a quart of water in the zip lock bag and open the swab and thoroughly mix it in the bag. Pour in any residual povidone in the outside protective wrap. Now seal the bag and cut a small hole in either bottom corner. Make sure the hole is SMALL. Now you can squeeze the bag and direct the stream into the wound. Easy to make, very efficient. Takes up almost no room.

I would also recommend a small bottle of Zephiran Aqueous. Should you happen to be bitten by something that might be rabid, mixing this in a 50/50 solution of water and thoroughly irrigating the wound, MAY destroy the rabies virus. If nothing else, it will buy you some time. This solution is better than Povidone in destroying this particular virus. Be sure you get deep into the wound when doing this. Better yet, stay away from carcasses you happen upon and shoot anything that gets close and exhibits the symptoms of rabies.

Many years ago I spent three years as a trainer for a 200-man County Sheriffs Department, even though my full-time job was in the steel industry. I got to play as much as I wanted (which wasn't much)with the 870's that were issued to the entry teams going into gambling joints. The purpose of these shotguns was mainly psychological. These shotguns were very similar to the Serbu mentioned above, though slighly longer in magazine and barrel. Trust me, with 00 buck, they are a real experience to shoot. Also, don't expect them to be "scatterguns". At seven yards the typical pattern was referred to as a "rat hole". If you've ever seen a rat hole, you'll have an idea of the relative lack of spread. Newer tactical buckshot loads will kick less, but it still isn't any fun. However, if you do your part, it will certainly terminate any "urban renewal" issues you may encounter in such a situation.

Posts: 226 | From: Indiana | Registered: Mar 2004  |  Logged: 216.135.25.139
anthracitic
Member
Member # 1181

posted December 18, 2004 10:39 PM                       
Steel, stick an Igloo wound irrigator on the end of that big syringe and you're good to go, esp. if you irrigate a wound on someone else. Shields the provider from being splashed with anything infectious in the blood of the victim.

www.Bionix.com

Posts: 50 | From: Cody Wyoming | Registered: Nov 2004  |  Logged: 69.145.97.100
anthracitic
Member
Member # 1181

posted December 18, 2004 10:41 PM                       
10-4 the zerowet syringe, same function as the igloo.
Posts: 50 | From: Cody Wyoming | Registered: Nov 2004  |  Logged: 69.145.97.100
Ed C
Member
Member # 81

posted December 18, 2004 11:34 PM                      
anthracitic

That is one awsome weapon. Tell me more about the survival you teach. Or where I can get information.

Ed

Posts: 145 | From: Whidbey Island, Wa. | Registered: Jan 2003  |  Logged: 209.166.76.203
Sgathak
Member
Member # 174

posted December 19, 2004 12:06 AM                      
Good chunk of info already laid out... Ill try not to repeat too much

I drive a CJ-5 (only had it about 9 months - still working out kinks in the following list)... limited storage, just as limited on security options. Ive got a "tuffy" console that is lockable and virtually immune to theft. But, its only about 12"x18"x18" so I have to go light (and be creative)

I carry basic road emergency items (jumper cables, basic tools, quart of oil - will be adding a hilift jack soon - carried on bumper.). I also have a basic knife (Cold Steel Bushman), a Shovel (CS Spetsnaz model - all 4 edges sharpened - many many uses), a saw (small buck saw works great), a Swiss Army Knife (hunter model is a keeper), and CS trailhawk (for when Im going really out into the woods)... There is significant overlap of duties here, the Shovel and the SAK could do the same things if need be.

I also carry:
a Space Blanket
Plasch Palatka (Russian poncho - very versatile)
Thinsulate Poncho Liner
SAS Survival tin
First Aid Kit (USGIs plastic box model)
Compass
Map of Area
MiniMaglight (w/ spare AA batteries)
Fire starting supplies
empty 70oz camelbak bladder
iodine tablets (stored in FAK)

And I think thats basically it... they are usually in the Tuffy packed loosely, but I have a Blackhawk backpack (roughly the same size as a Kifaru E&E pack) that all items will store in, or can be stored on (tied down).

Since I know that this list is very feature limited all things considered, I also have a larger bag with more specialized tools that I toss in the back any time I think I might need them, and am not worried about them being stolen (like in the city or at a hikers trailhead)

Posts: 552 | From: Formerly Golden CO.... | Registered: Feb 2003  |  Logged: 4.227.252.183
Sawtooth
Member
Member # 610

posted December 19, 2004 07:51 AM                         
Sgathak,

I drove a CJ7 for 18 years. Some one the whole time. I got an aftermarket container that fit behind the back seat. Lockable. I also had put pouches on the roll bar by the back side windows. That extended my storage quite a bit. A lot of the list I posted above was also carried in the Jeep, with the exception of the gas powered winch. Didn't need it because I had a Ramsey on the front bumper. Is this the same Jeep you had at the Rondy???

Posts: 204 | From: Canon City, CO | Registered: Jan 2004  |  Logged: 66.82.9.57
Sgathak
Member
Member # 174

posted December 19, 2004 08:42 AM                      
Yes, same Jeep from the rondy. Ive looked into behind the seat storage... theres a nice from from Tuffy but its expensive. Being a CJ5, I dont have a tail gate (i guess some models do, mine doesnt), and there is no space behind the backseat (which isnt a big deal since I just took out the back seat anyway)

Tuffy has an under hood lockable tool box (you know how much dead air space is under the hood of a CJ, might as well use some of it) which is where Ill be putting all of my trail tools. Theres also enough room there for an Air compressor under the hood... and I may go with that as well... never hurts to be able to reinflate tires on the trail.

Ive drawn up plans for a fastback style hard top made out of diamond plate and lexan which will help with security, I just need to find someone willing to weld it up - and not charge an arm and a leg!.

Im hoping to eventually replace the body with a Kevlar tub and Kevlar hood/fender 1 peice. With a coyote brown paint job, and OD green Rhinoliner over the bumpers, nerf bars, and bed... but until then, its still just a big ugly red warthog.

Just to add to the list of carried gear, I forgot that theres also a cheap pair of USGI Sun Wind Dust Goggles, and a Shemagh from Brigade Quartermasters. I havent needed them in the last few months, but they came in handy in the summer.

Posts: 552 | From: Formerly Golden CO.... | Registered: Feb 2003  |  Logged: 4.227.253.1
anthracitic
Member
Member # 1181

posted December 19, 2004 03:23 PM                       
[QUOTE]Originally posted by Ed C:
[QB] anthracitic

That is one awsome weapon. Tell me more about the survival you teach. Or where I can get information.

Ed C, I've worked with a number of Young Marine programs, my present program is through Wyoming 4H, and am also working on what will be the nucleus of a statewide independent youth survival and outdooor skills program. The students run in age from 8 yr. olds through high schoolers.
What I teach is based on the climate and terrain of Wyoming.
It is centered on the choice of three objectives for the student to determine.
1. I will survive by traveling to safety.
2. I will survive by staying put, and waiting for help to arrive.
3. I will survive by evading or escaping from some form of danger.
We cover the following:
Controlling fear.
The survival mindset
wilderness first aid and second aid
Shelter
methods of fire building
water ( this is a dry climate, and so is of special note.} The vital importance of staying hydrated. How to prehydrate oneself as well. It amazes me to read some of these lists-200 lbs. of gear, 14 knives, and not ONE drop of water to drink, to irrigate a wound, or use topically.
land nav.
Our eq is based on a half dozen or so adv. tech. items that are breakthroughs in survival gear.
Another half dozen or so more comonplace items, as well some gear they make themselves, rounds out their bug out packs.
{There is only so much gear an eight year old can be expected to carry.}

It is gratifying to see boys and girls that age rise to the challenge and prevail.
We invent scenarios for the students to work from. We also study news accounts of outdoor fatalities in Wy. and try to learn from them.
I stress physical conditioning.
I challenge them. When they fail, we figure out how to do better. When they adapt and overcome, I let the world know it.
It is my privilege to work with these young people.
I hope to get Dick Blust to come to Cody next spring for a seminar. I have adapted much of his excellent, well thought-out method into my program.

There is so much bunk out there nowadays about survival. The best book ever written, (and I've read all I could ever find-)
Is 'Six ways in and Twelve ways out' I draw alot from this manual in my program, and every student gets a copy to go in their BOB.
If you'd be interested in links to some of the tech. eq we've adopted let me know. Some of it is amazing.
BTW, Steelworker talked about a product called Zephiran aqueous. Sounds like a good thing to have. I'd never heard of it before. Thanks Steel, I'm on it!
As the sign over the jungle school in Panama said-
LEARN AND RETURN!!

[ December 20, 2004, 06:45: Message edited by: anthracitic ]

Posts: 50 | From: Cody Wyoming | Registered: Nov 2004  |  Logged: 69.145.97.100
Ed C
Member
Member # 81

posted December 19, 2004 08:52 PM                      
anthracitic

I would certainly be interested. I have been to a lot of Peter Krumfeld's survival seminars. Then I have taken his videos to the scouts and tried to teach them. He teaches the stay put and survive fire building shelter signal mirrow, what to carry and so forth. So please send me the links you can post them or PM me. It is something I've always been interested in. I work with the scouts here when they ask me and I like to take young people hunting if their parents don't hunt.

Thanks
Ed

Posts: 145 | From: Whidbey Island, Wa. | Registered: Jan 2003  |  Logged: 209.166.76.143
don
Member
Member # 183

posted December 19, 2004 09:54 PM                      
Carrying your hilift jack on your bumper is not such a good idea. The plungers and verticle release bars that work them , get gummed up easily with rust or dirt. When you have problems, oil may get it going.With some winter slush driving you may have to take it apart to polish the moving surfaces.
As long as you are in a vehicle, take a full handle shovel, with sharpened digging edges. You can get traction dirt, scrape road surface, throw dirt on fires, dig a hole for your hilift when your bumper is on the ground.
I only throw in a snow shovel when we have a big snow year, or if I thought I would get into deep snow country.
I have never had a winch, but carry a good come along,with short and long chains, a 15 foot 5/8 poly rope with braded eyes and a shackle and hook , (for those who do not have a good attachment point). Also I have carried a 40 foot 7/8 poly and a pulley to fit it. It has got me several times out of jams.
A word of caution on poly ropes- You can jerk a heck of a load, there is a lot of stretch, but be careful what you hook to. It is a slingshot loaded with your chain or his bumper.
Some pieces of 2X6 to put under your hi lift sure beats jacking rocks into the ground until there are enough for support.
Don't forget a good set or two of chains, maybe a spare, setup for your tires.
don

Posts: 202 | From: Mt | Registered: Feb 2003  |  Logged: 209.240.205.61
anthracitic
Member
Member # 1181

posted December 19, 2004 10:50 PM                       
Plasma rope, that's the ticket.
Posts: 50 | From: Cody Wyoming | Registered: Nov 2004  |  Logged: 69.145.97.100
Sawtooth
Member
Member # 610

posted December 20, 2004 07:55 AM                          
Sgathak,

IMO, there are NO UGLY JEEPS!

Posts: 204 | From: Canon City, CO | Registered: Jan 2004  |  Logged: 66.82.9.11
ovis
Member
Member # 1087

posted December 20, 2004 12:54 PM                     
You guys may want to look at QuickClot......they have a website and it's pretty amazing stuff.....could be a big help after an accident or when the SuperCub can't get in due to weather, smoke, etc.

Joe

Posts: 42 | From: Anchor Point, Alaska | Registered: Oct 2004  |  Logged: 209.112.164.106
Sgathak
Member
Member # 174

posted December 20, 2004 01:33 PM                      
Some QuickClot and some Israeli bandages will go a long way to keeping blood in. Good point! Kind of expensive, but you can order just a few of each from Brigade Quartermasters or USCAV.

Ugly jeeps? Naw... Big snarly scarred up beasty Jeeps? Yeah, got one of them!

Hilift makes a hardcase to keep dirt/mud/snow out of the mechanism... The other option is to mount it from the hood hinges.

Posts: 552 | From: Formerly Golden CO.... | Registered: Feb 2003  |  Logged: 4.227.255.142
anthracitic
Member
Member # 1181

posted December 20, 2004 02:46 PM                       
Ed C.
Here's the trick stuff- Hope it's as useful to you as well.

www.sererescuesog.addr.com/USRSOG-Introduction.htm
Website for RSOG, and the survival manual Six Ways In and Twelve Ways Out

www.survivalschool.com/products/survival/whistle_buckle1.htm
A little piece of gear that the younger students really enjoy. Many of them wind up on school bookpacks.

www.hydrationtech.com/
Remarkable new water purification technology. Takes only seconds and can be used on the move. Lifesaving technology. In worst case scenarios will process urine.

www.geocities.com/equipmentshop/lwsb.htm
Lightweight Lamilite bag.

www.phantomlights.com/
Slick flashlights!

www.escape-co.com/Drowning_First_Aid.htm
Something EVERYONE should know-

www.shomer-tec.com/site/product.cfm?id=99885077-97BB-E02C-A1670A3DF7D87C7E
Glow Flex tape. Reflective AND glow in the dark! Useful stuff!
(I use it on my arrows between nock and fletching.)

survivalsheath.com/shelter/index.htm
Integral Designs Sil Poncho. Kifaru's combi poncho/hootch is probably more useful. I'd like to look one over sometime.

www.unbelievablesaw.com/
Darn sight more comfortable to use than the old ring handle wire survival saws.

www.survivalinthebushinc.com/catalogue.html
One source for the book, The Psychology of Wilderness Survival. Required reading for survival instructors.

www.geocities.com/ecotat/
Lamilite poncho liner and lightweight sleep systems

www.otsas.no/products/glowline.htm
Glow in the dark line
A real confidence builder for the younger students during practice sessions at night. Baselines and handrails during night landnav. practice. No more tumbling over guylines.

www.paragear.com/
This outfit has a selection of goggles that is immense!

www.malcolmmurray.com
The best in signal mirrors.

www.blizzardprotectionsystems.com
www.land-shark.com/Stealth-Main.htm
The lowly pocket space blanket has finally evolved into a truly lifesaving piece of equipment. One great piece of gear we don't go anywhere without. Take your pick-
With the Blizzard bag, or the shark, and a nuwick candle, one can save themselves from dying of hypothermia.

[ December 20, 2004, 20:16: Message edited by: anthracitic ]

Posts: 50 | From: Cody Wyoming | Registered: Nov 2004  |  Logged: 69.145.97.100
Ed C
Member
Member # 81

posted December 20, 2004 05:46 PM                      
anthracitic

Thankyou very much
Ed

Posts: 145 | From: Whidbey Island, Wa. | Registered: Jan 2003  |  Logged: 209.166.76.143
Steelworker
Member
Member # 736

posted December 20, 2004 10:11 PM                       
Never used the blizzard protection systems, but have two Land Sharks in the car, and one in each of our packs. Do you see any advantage of one over the other? This is the first I've heard of the Blizzard.
Posts: 226 | From: Indiana | Registered: Mar 2004  |  Logged: 216.135.25.40
anthracitic
Member
Member # 1181

posted December 20, 2004 10:27 PM                       
http://www.blizzardprotectionsystems.com/reflexcell/reflexcell_1.html
If you'll read the info on this page, it explains the cellular nature of their products. This is their real advantage. They not only reflect heat, but insulate as well. A person in trouble has only to put something insulative on the ground, wriggle into the emer. bag leaving just a peephole, lean up against a rock or tree, pull your legs up, set the nuwick between your legs and light all three wicks. Amazing how fast the bag warms up! Just don't fall asleep!!! One can wrap some aluminum foil around their thighs to be on the safe side. I do think the land shark is a great product too.

Posts: 50 | From: Cody Wyoming | Registered: Nov 2004  |  Logged: 69.145.97.100
anthracitic
Member
Member # 1181

posted December 20, 2004 10:31 PM                       
Also, as one warms up and gets comfortable again, set a cup of water on the nuwick and soon it's tea time!
Posts: 50 | From: Cody Wyoming | Registered: Nov 2004  |  Logged: 69.145.97.100