Tipi Talk
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No Floor in the Tipi
From: Buckram
Date: 09 Mar 2002
Time: 15:54:28 -0500
Comments
I am a bit confused. I have spent literally hundreds of nights in the woods in tent and bivi - but they all have floors in them. When I have slept under the stars it's usually a clear night. What happens when you sleep on the ground in a tipi with no floor? Doesn't your bag get wet? What about when you set your tent in snow? What am I missing?

Re: No Floor in the Tipi
From:
BrianH
Date: 09 Mar 2002
Time: 20:29:30 -0500

Comments
The only thing you will be missing is the added weight of the floor fabric. See Partick's essays on 4 season camping and tipis elsewhere on the website. After some time in a tipi, you'll wonder how you put up with the confines of a standard backpacking / mountaineering tent.

Re: No Floor in the Tipi
From:
VernAK
Date: 09 Mar 2002
Time: 20:55:20 -0500

Comments
I usually ended up slitting my tent floors with a knife point to let collected water escape....much prefer no floor. I usually have some plastic sheeting on the ground if I'm camped on damp ground. The mattress under the sleeping bag prevents dampness and a quick morning fire removes any moisture from Tipi walls.


Kifaru Tent Test....Coming Soon
From:
RME...Matt/SFS
Date: 25 Apr 2002
Time: 16:16:32 -0400

Comments
I finally ordered my 4-man tent/stove combo. I'll test it soon in Colorado (grandkids & grampa), Canada (enroute to new assignment), and Alaska (Kenai Peninsula in Fall...I hope). Reports to follow...

Re: Kifaru Tent Test....Coming Soon
From:
Tyde
Date: 25 Apr 2002
Time: 17:32:59 -0400

Comments
If you don't mind me asking, what line of work are you in? I live in Wasilla and am contemplating the tipi (4-man) myself. I believe that Patrick has sold me on the pack. I would be interested in your coments on the tipi's performance. Good Luck and Good Hunting Tyde

Re: Kifaru Tent Test....Coming Soon
From:

Date: 25 Apr 2002
Time: 18:32:22 -0400

Comments
Tyde, I don't mind at all. For the past 14 years I've been an Air Force security forces (some of the AF's best all-weather fighters are on the ground) officer and before that I spent some time as a gunner on AC-130a 'Spectre' gunships. I'll be syre to let ya'll know how the tent works out for me. I figure Alaska's rain and wind ought to give it a pretty good test.  Cheers, Matt

Re: Kifaru Tent Test....Coming Soon
From:
RME
Date: 25 Apr 2002
Time: 20:14:35 -0400

Comments
I just pulled my head outta my butt and noticed you said you're in Wasilla. Shoot me an e-mail at Eatmanfamily@kc.rr.com and I'll tell you how you can get hold of me when I get to Alaska if you'd like to look at the tent.

Re: Kifaru Tent Test....Coming Soon
From:
Sundles to Tyde
Date: 26 Apr 2002
Time: 00:18:17 -0400

Comments
Tyde, Ive been using the 8 man since 1990 and now have a 12 man. These tents are wonderful. Light weight, strong, easy to set up, etc..

Re: Kifaru Tent Test....for Sundles
From: VernAK
Date: 26 Apr 2002
Time: 11:57:48 -0400

Comments
Sundles, May I ask which fabric do you have in your 12 man...?.....The ladies at Kifaru sent some sample swatches of the two materials and two colors for my review....my 4 man is made from the heavier fabric but I find the light material interesting.
The tent weight difference is about 4 pounds but for our Super Cub supported camp, I can live with that especially at the price difference...
Any thoughts on the materials?
Thanks....Vern...Delta Junction, Alaska

Re: Kifaru Tent Test....Coming Soon
From: Tyde to Sundles
Date: 26 Apr 2002
Time: 19:15:26 -0400

Comments
Sundles, Do you have the liner in yours? Do you have a good deal of condensation? I was wondering how far the liner went down the side (Winter insulation)? What about the stove performance (banking coals, burn time, routine, etc.)? Do you have the warming tray for the stove? Would you like another question?
Thanks

Re: Kifaru Tent Test....for Sundles
From: Sundles to Vern
Date: 26 Apr 2002
Time: 20:26:39 -0400

Comments
Vern, my 12 man is made of the original, heavier material. Ive never used the lighter stuff, but Patrick tells me it is tougher as well as lighter. Ive been perfectly happy with the regular heavy material, but then Im packing in with animals to carry the load.

Re: Kifaru Tent Test....Coming Soon
From: Sundles to Tyde
Date: 26 Apr 2002
Time: 20:31:03 -0400

Comments
Tyde, I didnt even know these tents came with any type of liner. Also, I dont use the stoves much as I dont do a lot of winter camping, but when I have used them, they were very nice and every one of the attchments is usable, but how usable depends on your needs.

Re: Kifaru Tent Test....Coming Soon
From: Tyde to Sundles
Date: 26 Apr 2002
Time: 22:34:20 -0400

Comments
Sundles The liner is a new offering. I have used a liner in military tents for winter camping. That second layer traps a great deal of heat.
I was wondering how you used the options (i.e. warming tray) and your daily routine with the tent/stove. I plan on using this as my hunting camp for up to 21 days. It needs to be usable in one spot and yet highly mobile by foot. I hunt black bear in the spring Moose in the Fall and one other big game animal every year (Caribou, goat, deer, This year Sheep). I want a system that I can adapt to all of these. The shelter must be able to take the wetness of Kodiak, the snow of the Wrangles and the cold of the Slope, and be light weight. I realize this is a tall order, but I think Patrick is on to something. Enough about me. I really just want to know how you use the stuff, so that I can get some ideas on how I am going to use the stuff. I am suffering from the 4th type of knowledge (things that you don't know that you don't know) on this subject.
Thanks
Tyde

Re: Kifaru Tent Test....Coming Soon
From: Sundles to Tyde
Date: 27 Apr 2002
Time: 13:59:58 -0400

Comments
Tyde,
In some ways Im a poor person to ask, cause Ive never been into comforts too much. I'll happily suffer while the people around me are dieing and I dont even notice, in fact I wouldnt have thought I was suffering if they hadnt told me so.
Get every possible attachment for the stove and use it. This will tell you if its worth the weight and trouble. I think they are all useful. Ive been know to do all my cooking and heating of the tent with the little propane stoves--this is not real cozy or nearly as nice as the wood heat, but it is very fast and involves no hassels like getting wood or cleaning the stove or lighting the fire, etc.. You'd be amazed how long you can run on one of those propane bottles.
Ive been so happy with the tents the way they are, that I would not take the time to mess with a liner, ( never used a floor either, even though I bought one with my eight man--just use a little blue tarp and throw it away after a couple years)but my attitude might change if I ever used one.


Large Stove Burn Time??
From:
TJW
Date: 19 Dec 2002
Time: 21:27:56 -0500

Comments
I am looking for some comments on the large kifaru stove as far as burn time goes. Say you load the large stove full of good dry pine and turn the damper down does anyone know how long it will burn aprox?? Thanks TJW

Re: Large Stove Burn Time??
From:
Tim in Nevada
Date: 19 Dec 2002
Time: 21:32:43 -0500

Comments
I'm not sure of the burn time, as it varies with conditions, but it sure is nice several miles from the trailhead in a T-shirt with dinner cooking. (and light too)

Burn Time?? Reply this time not new post. oops!!
From:
Brian in WY.
Date: 20 Dec 2002
Time: 11:11:35 -0500

Comments
OOPs hit post instead of reply. Lets try this again.
TJW; I can tell you a little about my small stove in a 4 man tipi. After cookin my dinner and thawing out my clothes (at the same time) I give the stove as much pine wood as it can handle. On the new stoves with the air intake dampers on the front, I close both dampers and make sure both spark arestor screens are clean. When I hit the sack I am in as little clothes as possible and sleeping on top of my bag. Now I'm on the ground not on a cot. After about 3-4 hours I wake up and the stove is no longer cherry red, so I tuck away in the bag and dream of elk in my sights. Morning comes and I throw in some small wood and a match then I'm makin coffee and getting dressed in a warm tent.
Oh ya and by the way, this is all 10 miles from the nearest truck in the FlatTops Wilderness Area. Camp supplied by my two legs, back, and a longhunter pack. ;)
Good luck huntin everyone and Happy Holidays.
Brian R.

Re: Large Stove Burn Time??
From:
MikeM
Date: 21 Dec 2002
Time: 22:52:04 -0500

Comments
Tim do you have an 8 man? Are you able to get T-shirt conditions in, say 10 to 20 degree weather while sitting on the ground? Thanks.

Re: Large Stove Burn Time??
From:
Tim in Nevada
Date: 22 Dec 2002
Time: 01:53:12 -0500

Comments
Mike, I didn't have it in real cold weather. It probably only got down to 25 when I was using it in the early season. You can run yourself out of the tent in a matter of minutes at that temperature. I've got the 8 man ultralight with large stove. Awesome equipment. Even if I take a horse, I can eliminate one pack animal by not having the Alaknak and cylinder stove. Tim.

Re: Large Stove Burn Time??
From:
MikeM
Category: Category 1
Date: 22 Dec 2002
Time: 13:27:05 -0500

Comments
Thanks Tim. I got the same set up but haven't got the tent warm enough to wear a T-Shirt sitting on the ground. Oh is's comfortable all right just not T-shirt temperture. Although, if you stand up you'll cook. Even when hunting in Wisconsin where I can burn oak and hard maple. Guess I need to take more care staking the tent out to seal it better to the ground. I normally leave the built in window open for ventilation - thought it was to allow moisture to escape. Do you burn with a sealed up tent? Are you running the stove red hot, pipe and all? Appreciate any pointers. Mike.

Re: About the Stove
From:
Bryce
Date: 27 Apr 2002
Time: 21:39:39 -0400
Comments
In Colorado we usually burn pine. You fill up the stove and it burns for 15 or 20 minutes. The stove doesn't really hold the heat because the metal is lightweight, but the tent sure gets warmed up fast. When the current batch of wood starts to burn down, you fill the stove up again. Back east some hardwood would be pretty nice fuel.

Re: About the Stove-To Bryce
From:
John in Texas
Date: 27 Apr 2002
Time: 23:40:50 -0400
Comments
Bryce, does the turpentine in the pine cause problems for you? This past fall my hunting partner and I burned some pine (actually alot of pine)in our stove. The resins collected in the pipe and we had a flue fire. I must say, it was quite spectacular! The entire stove pipe was glowing red and fire was shooting out of the top for at least a foot! I thought we were going to have a meltdown! The resin eventually burned off and everything went back to normal. It was sure warm in our tent for a while though. This does say alot for the ruggedness of the equipment. John in Texas

Re: About the Stove-To Bryce
From:
Bryce
Date: 28 Apr 2002
Time: 00:19:29 -0400
Comments
When my stove is full of drywood the bottom of the stovepipe always glows red hot and flame shoots out the top. It looks kind of neat at night when you go outside.I think that your creosote problem might have been caused by burning green wood or dampering down the stove too much.

Re: About the Stove-To Bryce
From:
John in Texas
Date: 28 Apr 2002
Time: 13:38:00 -0400
Comments
You're right. The resin plugged the spark screen. When we cleared the screen, the oxygen hit the smoldering gases and the resin that had collected throughout the pipe ignited. The whole pipe was red. It was really spectacular. We modified our fire construction after that. We used less lighter pine to start the fire, and also kept a supply of split dry wood in the tent with us. This made it easier to start the fire and produced one with less resinous vapors. No problems after that. It sure was a pretty sight!


small stove question
From:
Dean
Date: 30 Oct 2002
Time: 20:12:48 -0500
Comments
how long of a burn time do most of you guys get in your small stoves? I will need to use mine for the first time this weekend? Can you get it to burn for most of the night?

Re: small stove question
From: Bryce
Date: 30 Oct 2002
Time: 20:52:02 -0500
Comments
Dry pine branches about an inch or inch and a half in diameter will burn for about 15 minutes after you fill up the stove. This is the size wood that you can break with your foot. Feeding the stove with pine wood is a continuous job.

Re: small stove question
From: Ray-in-Texas
Date: 31 Oct 2002
Time: 10:46:41 -0500
Comments
Dean, Our experience matches Bryce's. The wood available in the Rocky Mountain West and the small sizes required (limbs/sticks) burn fast and hot!! John and I call ours a "two man" stove. One cutting limbs and one stoking. However, it sure makes backpack hunting more enjoyable. "Don't leave home without it!!"

Re: small stove question
From: Dean
Date: 04 Nov 2002
Time: 15:31:43 -0500
Comments
Boy you guys weren't kidding ! I was burning hard woods like cherry and oak in it this weekend and that thing ate them like candy and a kid on Halloween. Has anyone tried to damper the stove at all I guess the thing just gets to much air , I locked it up as tight as I could get it but it still burnt pieces 3 inches square pretty quick. Any ideas.

Re: small stove question
From: Dale Lindsley
Date: 05 Nov 2002
Time: 13:25:04 -0500
Comments
I have tried sliding a can lid in with one of the spark arrestors to act as a damper. It works pretty well. I find though, that larger diameter wood is also a good way to reduce the burn rate.

Re: small stove question
From: Dean
Date: 05 Nov 2002
Time: 16:43:46 -0500
Comments
Dale that is a good idea with the can lid , I will try that this weekend and let you know what I think. Did you have any problems with smoke inside the tent after you put the lid in ? I had flame shooting a foot and a half out of the pipe this past weekend with all those hardwoods. My buddy was laughing his butt off he said I looked like some kind of space craft getting ready to take off. I told him to go sleep in his cold car.

Re: small stove question
From: Dean to Patrick
Date: 05 Nov 2002
Time: 17:33:10 -0500
Comments
Patrick , would you consider making a para tipi with the stove towards the back of the tipi rather than the front lets say just in front or behind the seam that runs across the tent? Heres why I ask, I used the para this weekend for the first time and it was great heat , stove to cook with all the points you mention in your reasoning on why I bought one, but with the stove towards the front I found myself hugging to the tipi walls to avoid fear of burning my sleeping bag, also the rear area of the tipi very low in profile is more conducive to storing wood rather than your pack( when you want to get in your pack you would have to pull it out into the middle of the tent to look in it anyway why not have it there to begin with)I also felt that while entering and exiting the tipi it was a little cluttered with the wood pile the stove and the two of us sitting up in the tallest part of the tent where we spent most of our time when not sleeping.My partner and I felt that by moving the stove to the rear it would open up the front of the tipi where the most action occurs an make better use of the space to the rear with less moving around of equipment as well as eliminating the fear of burning your bag and being able to keep off the tipi walls reducing drips. Another side bar to this would be a small weight savings in being able to shorten up the stove pipe . What are your thoughts on this? Keep up the good work man the gear and concept is top shelf.

Re: small stove question
From: Dale Lindsley
Date: 06 Nov 2002
Time: 11:32:14 -0500
Comments
If you have a smoke problem just open the "damper" a little. I think a one foot flame out the top of the stack is par for the course, at least with the short Paratipi stack that I have. I don't consider this a bad thing.

Re: small stove question
From: Patrick
Date: 06 Nov 2002
Time: 22:19:03 -0500
Comments
Dale-- If you are really rocking with the stove even the pipe on the 10 1/2 foot tall 12 man tipi will show flame out the top. Two feet is not unusual. Very normal,in fact, and does NOT indicate a "chimney fire" at all. And it won't hurt the tipi at all either. Patrick

Re: small stove question
From: Patrick
Date: 06 Nov 2002
Time: 22:30:34 -0500
Comments
Dean-- Hoo boy! I developed the Paratipi over about six or seven years and had the stove placed in every conceivable location at one time or another. I concluded the location where it is as the overall "best". It allows you to sit completely upright, leaning back in your pack's CargoChair and feed the stove/cook. Especially if you're alone--which is the most-often scenario for the Para. Did you know you can turn the stove backwards and sleep behind it? Just lift by the bottom of the legs and turn it rearward. There is also a lot of lattitude in moving the stove forward or backward--the stovepipe can tilt to accomodate this. Give some of these things a try and get back to me, OK?
Patrick

Re: small stove question
From: Dean
Date: 07 Nov 2002
Time: 16:35:12 -0500
Comments
I certianly will Patrick . Thank you for the reply.


Seam Sealing?
From:
Tyde
Date: 30 Apr 2002
Time: 11:08:21 -0400
Comments
I was looking for the postings on seam sealing and I couldn't find them (lack of sleep proably). Does anyone remeber what the formula was? Something like mineral spirits and regular silicone caulting??????? Tyde

Re: Seam Sealing?
From:
Bryce
Date: 30 Apr 2002
Time: 21:07:50 -0400
Comments
Talk about timing. I just picked up my paratipi this afternoon. Patrick gave me a tour of his military pack operation. Anyway I put 4 sheets of plywood on the warehouse floor and set up the paratipi with nails for pegs. The tent takes up almost all of the plywood except for a couple of feet at one end. Pretty big footprint for a 3 lb. tent. I put about a third of the silicone sealer in a plastic cup, added a little paint thinner and stirred it with a stick until it was a thinner consistancy. Then I brushed it on with a one inch throw away paint bruch. $.69 at the hardware store. I ended up using all of the silicone and did all the seams and bartacks. Very fast. You can brush about 5 or 6 inches at a time.
On another subject- Pockets on the packs. I use the handwarmer accessory which has a pocket or a handgun carrier which has a larger pocket. This holds the camera, map in a plastic bag,compass, sometimes a ruger. Then in the possibles bag I have a bottle of water and food. When it is really hot I carry a hydration system. It is a gregory which holds about 100 ozs. of water. I have a GPS in its carrier. I find that I never have to take my pack off except to get a coat. The knives and and cleaning stuff are in a stuff sack in the pack. I really don't miss pockets on the pack because I can't reach them anyway. I went on a hike with Patrick last fall and he showed up with the same stuff. Spike camp, handwarmer, possibles pouch, GPS carrier and a really neat lightweight rifle to protect me.

Re: Seam Sealing?
From:
John in Texas
Date: 30 Apr 2002
Time: 23:37:48 -0400
Comments
Tyde-- I applied silicone caulk right from the tube to the seams then rubbed it in with my finger. (I was wearing latex gloves.) I left the tent set up to allow the hot sun to soften the silicone and allow it to further penetrate the seams. This past October, my hunting partner and I were rained on for six days straight, and the tent showed no signs of a leak. Good Luck with your tent. John

Re: Seam Sealing?
From:
David Lowry
Date: 01 May 2002
Time: 13:28:29 -0400
Comments
I'm curious how much a tube of that stuff weighs.

Re: Seam Sealing?
From:
Tyde to All
Date: 01 May 2002
Time: 14:56:26 -0400
Comments
Thank you for the help and instructions.
Good Luck and Good Hunting
Tyde

New 8 man Tipi question
From:
Flashman
Date: 19 Mar 2002
Time: 23:31:12 -0500

Comments
I just received my 8 man tipi Monday. I was hoping it would arrive last Friday so I could set it up on the weekend before the rendevous I am going to this Saturday. The video mentions the seems need to be sealed. Must it be warm to do this. I expect it will be no warmer than 45 to 50 degrees and blowing like a son of gun in the Oregon High Desert but really want to try it out. Must the sealer be applied with the Tipi assembled? Thanks.

Re: New 8 man Tipi question
From:
Phil
Date: 20 Mar 2002
Time: 07:53:52 -0500

Comments
Flashman: Maybe I can help -- I've seam sealed lots of stuff in my day. Personally, I believe seam sealer is much affected by temperature. In fact, get towards the freezing mark and your bottle of seam sealer will coagulate into a solid mass -- hence that ominous warning on the directions!! Try to set up your tipi in the garage with a heater going. Since I seal the seams both inside and out the tipi or tent, setting it up will greatly facilitate the process and make less of a gooey mess. Finally, the bottle of seam sealer with the ball applicator is MUCH quicker than using a million q-tips. I believe the bottle that Patrick gives you upon purchase of a tipi fortunately has a ball applicator.
Regards, Phil from Bozeman, MT

Re: New 8 man Tipi question
From:
Kevin
Date: 20 Mar 2002
Time: 08:35:47 -0500

Comments
For every 18 degrees colder than 77 degrees F, the cure time doubles. In other words, hotter is much, much better.

Re: New 8 man Tipi question
From:
Sundles
Category: Category 1
Date: 20 Mar 2002
Time: 08:59:36 -0500

Comments
To All on seam sealing listen up, This is a secret I learned from Patrick who had recently learned it himself. Ive fought with seam sealer for years--it lasts only a few years and then starts to peel.
Get SILICONE caulking!!!! It is a 30 year product. It is cheap. It comes in big tubes that function with a caulk gun. Put it on heavy, with the tent up. Let it dry for a couple days and the seams will be sealed for the life of your tent. I used some leftover caulking from doing my house window frames when this house was built on my 12 man tipi last fall--I'll never again have to worry about the seams--its done, over, finished for the life of that tent. Thankyou Patrick! Use this same product when patching your tent--it makes a permanent patch job. If only I had known this for the last twenty years of sealing and patching tents!!!!

Re: New 8 man Tipi question
From:
R&R to Sundles
Date: 20 Mar 2002
Time: 12:08:32 -0500

Comments
Tim, One of those ideas like safety pins, ziplocs and zippers! Why didn't I think of that? I hate sealing a new tent, what makes it worse is knowing as much as I use mine and how hard they are used is that I will have to repeat the process in a few years. Gotta love this board thanks for the tip! R&R

Re: New 8 man Tipi question
From:
Rod
Date: 20 Mar 2002
Time: 22:06:55 -0500

Comments
To the seam sealers,
The silicone caulking is definitely the way to go. I also will cut it w/ about 50% paint thinner and use some of those small cheap stiff plastic brushes with the metal handles you find at the hardware store. The kind used for applying flux for soldering. The stiff bristles push the material into the seams without damaging them. Also, mix in small batches, about a quarter cup or so. The warmer the better. Have fun , Rod

Re: New 8 man Tipi question
From:
John in Texas to Tim and the board
Date: 20 Mar 2002
Time: 22:12:04 -0500
Comments
You're entirely correct Tim. My hunting partner and I used the silicone caulk on our tipi before this past years trip to the Selway Wilderness. It rained on us for the first 6 days we were there and not one drop came through the seams. The technique we used was to apply the silicone with a caulking gun and then rub it in with our finger to insure even impregnation of the seam. The heat from the Texas sun helped the silicone to penetrate completely into the seam. It has worked flawlessly.

Re: New 8 man Tipi question
From:
JohnT
Date: 20 Mar 2002
Time: 22:12:46 -0500
Comments
Silicone caulking sounds like a great idea. The original seam sealers worked, but peeled. Then the environmentalists got into the mix and forced a change in formula. The new stuff not only peels, but doesn’t work very well (like every other environmentally forced change, the end product is far worse than the original). One product that does work, and may be the same as silicone caulking, is “Silnet”, sold by Campmor. They sell it to go with their ‘Ultralight Backpacking Tarps’. It’s a fantastic product, but costs $5/1.5oz. A standard 10 oz. silicone caulking tube costs about $5. Sounds like a deal to me.

Re: New 8 man Tipi question
From:
Bryce
Date: 22 Mar 2002
Time: 04:51:32 -0500
Comments
I set mine up inside with nails for tent pegs so that the seams were stretched very tight. Then I mixed 100 percent silicon with mineral spirits and brushed it on with a throw away brush.


Wall Tent VS Tipi Got it Right This Time
From:
TJW
Date: 10 Dec 2002
Time: 15:37:23 -0500
Comments
It seem my post didn't get posted woops. Anyway this fall a buddy and me packed pack into the steep mountains of the north fork of the Salmon river in Idaho. I took a wall tent and cylinder stove, good outfit, but it took one horse to pack the darn thing. We about killed the poor horse going in. And by the time I cut poles and put it up I was exhausted. I am either going to have to get more pack stock or buy a 8 man tipi. Those wall tents with stoves that burn all night look great while your home but their is a lot of work and expense people don't realize that comes with them. I am going to have to get a tipi, that way I will only have to take one pack horse for everything.

Re: Wall Tent VS Tipi Got it Right This Time
From:

Date: 10 Dec 2002
Time: 16:48:11 -0500
Comments
TJW, You are right. Three of us has one pack horse carry most all of our gear this year. We did not have a Kifaru tipi, but we had a 22lb tent/tipi hybrid with a lightweight, homemade stove. It easily fit in one side of the pannier(sp?). A 12 man tipi would have saved 10lb's easy and been even more compact. Heat is good! So is not messing around with fuel and backpacking stoves. We made basecamp about 4 miles in and hunted from there. An easy walk when you are only carrying your rifle and a fanny pack.

Re: Wall Tent VS Tipi Got it Right This Time
From:
Ed
Date: 10 Dec 2002
Time: 17:10:34 -0500
Comments
You not only will revel in the weight savings but in the set-up time. An 8 man tipi-10-15 minutes for one man. A wall tent maybe half a day for tow guys if they are good and camped in the right spot. Once you have gone the TIPI WAY you will never go back!

Re: Wall Tent VS Tipi Got it Right This Time
From:
Ed C
Date: 11 Dec 2002
Time: 02:38:41 -0500
Comments
I have a custom built wall tent [by Bravo] and a Reily stove for horse packing. It's a dandy set up tent 22lb. stove 16lb. The stove is awsome it will hold a fire for 7 or 8 hrs. with good wood. I set it up at the trail head this year as a base camp. My thinking was it would be a great place to spend the night if I was packing meat [backpacking]. I did spend three nights out of 12,so it worked good. Problem is it took 3 or 4 hours to set it up by myself. I know I can set up an 8 man tipi in 10 or 15 min. by myself, and I'm planning on getting one for a base camp. It occurs to me that it would be really nice to use the Reilly stove in the tipi, since weight is not a problem. It would be easy to plug the kifaru stove pipe into a short peice of pipe from the Reilly stove. I was going to ask Patrick about this some time this year so I guess now is a good time if you read this. So how bout it Patrick would it work?
Ed C

Re: Wall Tent VS Tipi Got it Right This Time
From:
Patrick
Date: 11 Dec 2002
Time: 10:20:53 -0500
Comments
Hello Ed--
Our "collars", which hold the absolutely neccessary filter screens, are sized 3, 3 1/2, and 4 inches, depending on size of stove (Para/Small, Medium, and Large, respectively). If your Riley stovetop hole is any of these sizes it should work. We've done this a time or two for folks who don't ever intend to pack in on foot. You MUST use our stovepipe (or at least our collars) because the exhaust must be filtered for use in our nylon tents. Got it?
Patrick

Re: Wall Tent VS Tipi Got it Right This Time
From:
shu
Date: 11 Dec 2002
Time: 16:35:49 -0500
Comments
Patrick--
How do the filter screens differ than an in-line style spark arrestor? Would this work with your tipis? What would it take to fit one of your collars into a stove with a 4" hole?
While on the subject, how big a stove would you suggest in an 8-man tipi before it became a fire hazard? It looks like your large stove has about a .75 cubic foot capacity, whereas the small stove in question is about 1.6 cu.ft.
Thanks; shu

Re: Wall Tent VS Tipi Got it Right This Time
From:
Patrick
Date: 11 Dec 2002
Time: 21:19:32 -0500
Comments
shu--
I'm not sure what you mean by "in-line spark arrestor"; I consider mine in-line. Our 4" collar will routinely fit any 4" hole.
With the advent of our Military Division we have been working on an Arctic Series of stoves intended for use in our tipis in mid-winter in the coldest places on earth. Ed and I burned a prototype at least four (4) times bigger than our present Large stove back in November. This stove was overkill even for 75 below (we are extrapolating; we weren't really in weather that cold--it was perhaps 25 above), but we wanted to see what would happen. Sort of like your curiosity on the subject. We burned that big rascal full-tilt, with resinous wood. Frankly, it was rather scary. We had to leave the doors zipped, for test integrity, and WOW was it HOT in there! Certainly sauna-like. We were hugging the floor. Anyway, very impressive burn. No ill affects. Ed is still using that 8-man for ongoing tests.
So, I'll answer your question re how large a stove can be safely used in our eight man tipi by saying three times bigger than our Large stove, since your speaking, I think, of a non-Kifaru stove and I'd like to be conservative therefore. And start "small", insofar as fire "intensity", whilst monitoring things. Patrick

Re: Wall Tent VS Tipi Got it Right This Time To Shu
From: Ed C
Date: 11 Dec 2002
Time: 21:26:31 -0500
Comments
Shu My Reilly has a 5in. hole. I was going to take a one ft. peice of pipe with the damper in it reduce it to 4in. plug the Kifaru pipe with the collar and screens in and I'm set. If was too much stove I was going to buy a smaller size. I was also going to buy the Kifaru stove in case 4 guys wanted to go backpacking. If you have a 4 in. hole you're set. I would like to add that I am in no way trying to improve on Kifaru gear my tipi and small stove is probably the greatest thing going. It would just be nice to have the other stove in a base camp situation where weight was not a problem. Ed C

Re: Wall Tent VS Tipi Got it Right This Time To Shu
From: David Lowry
Date: 12 Dec 2002
Time: 12:07:52 -0500
Comments
Ed C. I also have a big interest in this, as noted in my post somewhere down below that no one replied to.
It sounds like you are a bit more handy w/ sheet metal than me, but here is a website that sells reducers for 5 bucks. Sroll down towards the bottom of this page:
http://www.cylinderstoves.com/accessories_frame.htm
Does Reilly have a website?

Re: Wall Tent VS Tipi Got it Right This Time To Shu
From: shu
Date: 12 Dec 2002
Time: 19:09:22 -0500
Comments
Try
http://www.rileystoves.com

Re: Wall Tent VS Tipi Got it Right This Time
From:
shu
Date: 12 Dec 2002
Time: 19:28:47 -0500
Comments
Hi Patrick-- What I referred to as an in-line spark arrestor is listed by Cabelas as a 'stack robber'. I was curious whether the extra heat this keeps from going up the pipe would be overkill in a tipi. I was also unsure whether you use a finer mesh than other arrestors. I appreciate the info on your stove experiments. I don't know that I would ever use a bigger stove but it is nice to know what might work if I wanted to try it. I think Ed C just got me thinking about the possibilities. At this point I am putting the cart before the horse as I still don't have a tipi, but I am hoping to change that this spring--my daughter is looking forward to having an "Indian tent". Thanks again; shu

Re: Wall Tent VS Tipi Got it Right This Time
From:
Patrick
Date: 13 Dec 2002
Time: 14:39:08 -0500
Comments
Hi shu-- Well, I dug out the big fall 2000 Cabelas catelog, but all I can find is a Spark Arrestor--nothing about 'stack robber'. Nevertheless, I would call what I see here as "in-line", yes. Differences from my Kifaru system are as follows: a) I use two flat discs rather than one cone; b) one does not have to seperate the stovepipe stack to clean my version; c) one does not need to put on gloves to clean my version; d) one can clean my screens one at a time--thus keeping the screening protection constant.
On the subject of mesh pattern, I'm going to have to assume their mesh is for cotton or hybrid fabrics and therefore too coarse for use in my all-synthetic tipis. In other words, PLEASE don't try it. We'll make your daughter an "Indian tent" anytime you say. Patrick


Tipi Liner Experience Anyone??
From:
TJW
Date: 21 Dec 2002
Time: 11:28:49 -0500
Comments
I am going to get an 8 man ultralight tipi soon, I will use it in the late fall hunting at high elevations in idaho. It can rain and have wet snow this time of year. I am wondering if the tipi liner is worth having. Anyone with experience with it I would appreciate your comments. Merry Christmas
TJW

Re: Tipi Liner Experience Anyone??
From:
MikeM
Date: 21 Dec 2002
Time: 23:25:47 -0500
CommentsI have an 8 man. Used it for various trips all 4 seasons. The only time I turned it into a green house was summer camping when I set it up on saturated ground in sunny 75+ temps. Too warm for a fire. Thought about a linner for summer canoe camping but decided it wasn't the right item for me since I wsn't willing to pack the extra weight for the other seasons. (Provided you can burn wood!)


Alternative stoves
From:
Karl
Date: 19 Dec 2002
Time: 17:38:24 -0500
CommentsI noticed some discussion surrounding this topic but thought I would go straight to the point. The Kifaru stoves are state of the art for packable wood burning heat but they have short burn times compared to non-packable stoves. I've seen some small stoves (e.g., four dog stove co.)that would be fine for truck camping and have longer burn time. Still like the Kifaru when hoofing it but what other stove works in a tipi (8-man), is safe, but may be less portable/longer burn time. Any experience?? Thanks...

Re: Alternative stoves
From:
TJW
Date: 19 Dec 2002
Time: 21:25:22 -0500
Comments
From the converation I have had with Patrick in earlier posts I have concluded that a wall tent stove that is airtight such as the cylinder stoves might work. One would have to be careful where the pipe went throught the tipi at the top as it might get to hot and hurt the nylon, maybe you could devise some extra kind of a heat sheild around the area. Also their isn't a great spark arrestor like Kifaru has in thier stove pipe so it would probably be wise to add an additional screen for sparks. TJW

Re: Alternative stoves
From:
Bryce
Date: 19 Dec 2002
Time: 23:41:56 -0500
Comments
Patrick could invent a propane burner insert for a stove connected to a 20# propane tank outside the tent.

Re: Alternative stoves
From:
Karl
Date: 20 Dec 2002
Time: 11:32:28 -0500
Comments
Actually I used a propane burner inside my tent this year since we had a fire ban. Apparently, H2O is a by-product of burning propane (or so I was told). Anyway, the condensation became pretty extreme

Re: Alternative stoves
From:
BobB
Date: 21 Dec 2002
Time: 03:38:12 -0500
Comments
I always thought carbon monoxide was a by product of burning propane gas. Is this safe in your tent?

Re: Alternative stoves
From:
paonia coyote
Date: 21 Dec 2002
Time: 10:47:40 -0500
Comments
Water and carbon dioxide are the main by products of burning any hydrocarbon(wood,coal,oil, natural gas, propane,etc). Also produced in varying quantities depending on many variable factors are carbon monoxide,unburnt hydrocarbons, and other chemicals.

Re: Alternative stoves
From:
Tim in Nevada
Date: 21 Dec 2002
Time: 15:44:10 -0500
Comments
Without proper ventilation, it can kill you. Tim.

Re: Alternative stoves
From:
Karl
Date: 23 Dec 2002
Time: 12:10:53 -0500
Comments
Just got back to the board. Thanks for the concern! Yes, we left both door vents open. I sure wish there was a better solution when faced with fire bans. Thankfully, CO seems to be getting some snow this year.

Re: Alternative stoves
From:
BobB
Date: 23 Dec 2002
Time: 15:39:00 -0500
Comments
I came across on the net a tent heater that blows hot air into your tent that is free of noxious gases, its called the Zodi hot vent tent heater at www.zodi.com. Whilst I've no experience with these tent heaters, it sounds a whole lot safer.Some review I read declared hunt outfitters used them at there base camps. Maybe someone on the board has knowledge of this type of heater. I hope this helps.


Stoves to David Lowry
From:
Ed C
Date: 12 Dec 2002
Time: 18:11:40 -0500
Comments
David
I remember your post and I was hoping somebody else would reply. Anyway I went out to my garage and looked at my stove, and it's a Riley not Reilly. Yes they do have a web www.rileystoves.com Thanks for the site that reducer is exactly what I was talking about. I measured my stove and it's 10in. deep 13in. wide and 22in. long, about the same size as Kifaru large stove. So I'm thinking it would be a swell addition to an 8 or 12 man tipi, but only if it came in by truck. If I'm packing- back or horse the Kifaru is going. If I remember right you have a para tipi and a dog team and sled. Sounds like fun you probably want some snow. One time in a truck situation [base camp] I pitched my para tipi and burned presto logs I had to break them up. They had a really long burn time, and burn really hot. Anyway thanks for the site.
Ed C

Re: Stoves to David Lowry
From:
David Lowry
Date: 12 Dec 2002
Time: 18:36:04 -0500
Comments
Thanks Ed C. I'd like to hear more ideas on where to hunt Elk in WA, besides Bethel Ridge, as beautiful as that place is. I've had my eye on that late season hunt over in Camas Land /Tronsen Ridge area. I need to go with I guide and learn the ropes first.
I have the 8-man and old large stove. Noway I'll part with that gear. I tried a few chunks of wax logs once in the backyard. I was not minding the spark arrestors and they clog up fast- disaster. Folks wanting to try that should keep that in mind. Leave the arrestors out or mind them very carefully.
Thanks for the Reily site, I will study it tomorrow. It sounds ideal for sno-park camping.

Re: Stoves to David Lowry
From:
Ed C
Date: 12 Dec 2002
Time: 19:25:07 -0500
Comments
David
You misspelled it also it's Riley. I have the Side Kick model, and it has a 4 in. hole I had to go measure it again. I'll talk to you about elk hunting Wa. sometime. We have a whole year to talk about it now. Ed C

Re: Stoves to David Lowry
From:
Dale Lindsley
Date: 13 Dec 2002
Time: 11:47:15 -0500
Comments
I assume you guys already know about the titanium stoves made by "Four Dog" stoves http://www.fourdog.com/page3.html By the way, has either of you, or anyone else on this board, hunted the Phelps Creek area near Lake Wenatchee (Washington State) for deer?

Re: Stoves to David Lowry
From:
David Lowry
Date: 13 Dec 2002
Time: 12:23:15 -0500
Comments
Thanks for the link Dale. I have not hunted Phelps. That would be outstanding in terms of remoteness. That and the Sawtooth side of Chelan NRA (S. Facing)?

Re: Stoves to David Lowry
From:
OliverG
Category: Category 1
Date: 13 Dec 2002
Time: 12:52:31 -0500
Comments
Do these stove purport to be "airtight"? How do their burn times compare to the kifaru stoves?
Thanks, Oliver...

Re: Stoves to David Lowry
From:
Dale Lindsley
Date: 13 Dec 2002
Time: 13:50:16 -0500
Comments
I met a ranger in the Enchantments this fall (maiden voyage for my Longhunter) who said the deer were a nuisance on Phelp's Creek. I hunted within a few miles of there once, car camping, and was struck by the amount of deer sign. The idea of packing in there seems like fun. First, I'm going to have to get an eight-man TP.

Re: Stoves to David Lowry
From:
Ed C
Date: 14 Dec 2002
Time: 01:02:41 -0500
Comments
Oliver G
Some of the stoves like the Cylinder Stoves are air tight. The burn time can be 8 hrs. Problem is the small one weighs 50 to 60lbs. My Riley weighs 18lbs. without the warmig tray, water heater, or pipes. I hope I didn't give anybody the wrong impression, even if I pack in with my horses my tipi and Kifaru stove are going.

Re: Stoves to David Lowry
From:
Ed C
Date: 14 Dec 2002
Time: 01:38:08 -0500
Comments
Dale
I have seen those stoves at the sport shows. I'm not exactly sure where Phelps Cr. area is, but in the 80's we used to hunt Glacier Peak Wilderness above Lake Wenatchee, and we did quite well. If you think the deer are a problem in Phelps Cr. then maybe next year the three of us could get together and thin the herd out some. Ed C

Re: Stoves to David Lowry
From:
OliverG
Date: 14 Dec 2002
Time: 10:38:05 -0500
Comments
No worries on impression. Just got my 8 man w/ large stove in (christmas present; maybe I'll put the tree under it <g>). I have just read posts about the airtight and burn time and was curious as to whether or not these titaniums were striving for an airtight mode. Really looking forward to breaking in the stove 'n tent christmas night! Oliver...

Re: Stoves to David Lowry
From:
Dale Lindsley
Date: 14 Dec 2002
Time: 19:22:01 -0500
Comments
Sounds good to me! It looks to me like much of Phelps creek is in GP Wilderness. That means a Sept 15th early high hunt. The three point minimum in those early hunts doesn't seem so onerous now that the regular season is three point too. Phelps Creek runs into the Chiwawa River right at the end of the Chiwawa River road at the Trinity Mine.

Re: Stoves to David Lowry
From:
David Lowry
Date: 16 Dec 2002
Time: 16:49:33 -0500
Comments
That would be a Golden opportunity for me to accompany you two. Please keep me in mind.


Stove Pipe? To Patrick
From:
TJW
Date: 15 Dec 2002
Time: 16:16:00 -0500
Comments
Patrick, I was wondering from previous posts what the stove pipe collar with filter screens are for, I have never seen this. Also I have a cylinder stove and plan to get a 8 man tipi, will this stove and its pipe work in the tipi. The pipe it comes with is nesting stove pipe that starts at the stove at 5 inches wide. I am not always in need of the lightweight stove and since this burns for 8 hours it would be nice. Thanks in advance for the info. TJW

Re: Stove Pipe? To Patrick
From:
Patrick
Date: 15 Dec 2002
Time: 18:35:35 -0500
Comments
TJW--
Our disk-like filter screens rest in "slots" in the stovepipe assembly, down near the top of the stove. Because of the unique way one stows our pipe, and the unique thinness of the material itself, we can't put the slots in the pipe. So we created a "collar" of thicker material to house the screens. It's about 4" tall and goes flat for storage/transport with the rest of the stove parts when the stove is not in use.
If your cylinder stove starts out at the stove top at 5", does it taper narrower as it goes up? If it's about 4 1/2" where it passes thru the fireproof material in our tipi you should be OK burning it in the tipi as is. If it's bigger in diameter than that you will probably have a problem if you burn the stove full bore as it'll be too close to the standard tipi fabric. Let me know on this. I may check into getting one of the stoves you are talking about. If it really will burn all night (8 hours) it would be neat for those truck camp situations where I take the kids and grandkids target shooting. We like to spend the night so we can shoot long range late and early when the wind is calm. The females particularly will like the "all night" burn, know what I mean? Whether they "need" it or not.
Patrick

Re: Stove Pipe? To Patrick
From:
TJW
Date: 15 Dec 2002
Time: 21:22:20 -0500
Comments
Thanks Patrick for the info, one last question I did't quite understand. The filter screens in the collar, are they there to filter particles like a spark arrestor from the fire or to simple hold the stove pipe? I haven't ever seen a stove pipe with a filter in it except for a spark arrestor screen on top of the stove pipe. Have a good one.
TJW

Re: Stove Pipe? To Patrick
From:
Patrick
Date: 15 Dec 2002
Time: 22:31:29 -0500
Comments
TJW-- Yes, the screens are to filter sparks, and are essential for nylon tent with a stove inside. They are just above the firebox; I found that putting a filter at the top of the pipe was a disaster for two reasons: the thing clogs up much worse because the exhaust stream is a lot cooler by the time it exits the top of the pipe,and it's impossible to remove the filter for cleaning if it's way up at the top of the pipe when used in an eight or twelve man tipi. Lastly, I can use two filters when they're disk inserts which not only gives more thorough filtration but also allows for cleaning one at a time, which keeps protection in place at all times.
Patrick


Backpacker article
From: Karl
Date: 18 Mar 2002
Time: 19:59:10 -0500
Comments
I picked up the March issue of Backpacker. It had a huge gear review but no mention of the Kifaru tipi. I thought it was an "editor's choice". I wanted to read all about it but could find nothing. Patrick: will Backpacker allow you to post the article?

Re: Backpacker article
From:
Kevin
Date: 18 Mar 2002
Time: 21:29:06 -0500
Comments
It's in the April 2002 magazine. I got mine in the mail some time ago.

Backpacker Article Online
From:
Mike
Date: 22 Mar 2002
Time: 13:31:20 -0500
Comments
You can see the backpacker article online:
http://www.backpacker.com/gear/article/0,1023,3908,00.html


Tent platforms?
From:
bigbore442001@earthlink.net
Date: 14 Dec 2002
Time: 09:57:10 -0500
Comments
I am able to camp on the land of a club I belong to and I was thinking of building a wooden platform for people to set up tents at the club. I was wondering how the tipi would work out on a plywood platform? Anyone with suggestions or experience?

Re: Tent platforms?
From:
Patrick
Date: 14 Dec 2002
Time: 10:56:09 -0500
Comments
BigBore-- Sometimes when Kifaru goes to a Show as an Exhibitor we have to pitch whatever Tipi we're "showing" on a plywood deck. We just use bent-over nails or big staples thru the peg loops. Problem with this is that there will be a gap between the deck and the bottom edge of the tipi. On the earth this gap is partly taken up by the greater thickness of the regular peg (as compared to a skinny nail) and the rest is taken up by the simple fact that you can pound the peg in below ground level, thus getting a snug fit earth-to-tipi edge. (We just explain this to folks and they understand right off.) So it's not possible on a solid deck UNLESS you're willing to nail the sucker down right thru the nylon taped edge of the tipi. Rest assured you will NOT really damage the tipi--you'll just have visible evidence that you've driven nails thru its bottom edge for the rest of it's life. Drive 'em thru the black tape, NOT the canopy fabric. Got it? Oh, and be thoughtful when you pry the tipi off the deck so as not to unduly mangle the taped edge. Leatherman tools work well. Patrick


tipis 'n bears
From:
OliverG
Date: 12 Dec 2002
Time: 13:34:12 -0500
Comments
Just received my 8man ultralight tipi w/ large stove. Looks great (really impressed by stove bag attention to detail!)! Before I embark with my youngins (3 yrs 'n 9 months) I wanted to get the latest feedback on the whole issue of cookin' in the tent and the liklihood of getting unwelcome visitors who can kick my golden retriever's butt. What do you other tipi / stove folks do ?
Thanks, Oliver...

Re: tipis 'n bears
From:
Levi
Date: 12 Dec 2002
Time: 14:38:17 -0500
Comments
Oliver, had the same concern myself. If you scroll down the board to about mid April of this year you will see some great discussion about this topic..."Tipi Cooking in Griz Country".
Take care! Levi

Re: tipis 'n bears
From:
OliverG
Date: 13 Dec 2002
Time: 10:36:50 -0500
Comments
Thanks for the tip on the past posts. I checked them out and I guess I agree with the basic philosophy that we are at the top of the food chain (albeit with lead assistance). If I don't carry adequate firearms though (I don't have any, legality in certain areas, etc.), what are folks' thoughts as to the usefulness of alternatives such as pepper spray, flare guns (legal in parks?), etc.? I think my problem in Western PA and West-by-god-Virginia is one of way too human acclimatized black bears. I don't think my "scent" is going to deter them to any great degree (probably only serve to attract them). Are these bears detered by dogs at all? Powerful flashlights in conjunction with spray and flares? Or, do I just get properly equipped with a firearm? Obviously we're talking about rare occurences here but when prepared one does tend to sleep better (whilst remaining alert with attitude of course) <g>.
Thanks much, Oliver...

Re: tipis 'n bears
From:
Dale Lindsley
Date: 13 Dec 2002
Time: 13:39:10 -0500
Comments
In my limited experience as a kid in the Smokey Mts., a VERY small dog can run off even a VERY tame bear. Firecrackers are good too.

Re: tipis 'n bears
From:
Tyde to Oliver
Date: 13 Dec 2002
Time: 18:14:42 -0500
Comments
Oliver
I haven't posted in a while due to work, but here is my $0.04 (had a little experience) on bears and deterants.
1) Dogs are great. You want an overly protective, light sleeping, good at barking kind of dog. Rodesians, bouviers, akitas, and airdales are all good choices. But, a pug with an attitude will work in a pinch. You can also help in the noise deterant department (Pots and pans, Yelling, shouting, waving your hands and standing close together). As an aside, you are using the dog as a tool, and as such may have to use it as a sacrifice. I am not advocating feeding bears, I am just saying don't try and rescue the dog!!!!!!!
2) Peppar spray is extremely hazardous to the bear and you. Transportion to and from the field should be in a sealed ammo can located outside of the vehicle (preferably a trailer). Accidental discharge of spray will definately hit some one, most likely everyone. To use the bear has to be well in side of spitin' distance. Basically I would rely on some other deterant and leave the spray to tree huggers.
3) Fire arms goooood. 12 ga pump with an empty chamber, safety off, and decocked (all that is needed is to run the slide). Load it with 2 3/4" slugs (they cycle better), so a second shot is possible (allowing a warning shot, situation permitting).
4) Keep a clean camp. Food put away and hung, Gear packed, no eating on or in sleeping bag. Using the tent stove, stay away from or minimize the cooking of, greasey food (bacon, ham, stir fry, etc.).
5) Keep a low din of noise going at all time. With kids this should be easy.
Good luck and Good Hunting Tyde
P.S. When going remote for work, I carry a Mossberg 500 Mariner with pistol grip (You only want to shoot in self defense, sort of smarts) loaded with 5 - 2.75" slugs. I make just enough noise (sing songs, wistle, humm, blow on my wistle) to be heard within 100' at all times. I pick foods with low smell and keep sealed in plastic bags.

Re: tipis 'n bears
From:
Dave Roth to Oliver
Date: 14 Dec 2002
Time: 16:39:39 -0500
Comments
hi Oliver....I was brought to my kness by the PA laws and I bought the sportsman handgun permit for $5. I hope the politicians spend it in good health! Sorry i'm still a little mad about it! Any way....I take my hand gun with me when I camp(I call it coyote hunting!) But here's the deal...Where I take my family camping, there are many bears. Case closed. With the yearly increase in bear population in PA its only a matter of time before we start seeing people getting hurt. I sleep better in my TIPI with a .357
I also did bear proof camping in Montana with the TIPI. Somewhere in th archives is a good post on how we camped amongst scores of bear scat piles and we remained scent free. the basic idea is that the stove is poertable even when lit and burning! I removed it from the tipi and cooked at a location 100 yards way...It was aslo great for burning leftover food and waste... Dave

Re: tipis 'n bears
From:
MikeM
Date: 18 Dec 2002
Time: 19:44:45 -0500
Comments
Oliver, I had asked a similar question in March and got some terrific responses. You mentioned you went back and looked at some older posts. If you hadn't gone back this far, then look at April 21 for Tipi cooking, March 31 and 24 for Bears and light guns.

Re: tipis 'n bears
From:
Oz
Date: 22 Dec 2002
Time: 00:20:30 -0500
Comments
Hi Oliver, I guess at this point in my life I've had fairly extensive experience with bears, both black and brown/grizzly. My experience is by far and away greater with the brown/griz, plus I've tried to glean as much as I can from friends and colleagues as to their trials and tribulations with these amazing critters. I know for sure that one of these days my number is going to come up and I'll probably have some sort of trouble with one of these guys. So far our (not just mine but a large number of friends and guides) philosophy has been to keep food where we can keep an eye on it, be it in the tent or just outside, we've cooked generally not in our sleeping tent(s) but in a cook tent, whatever type it may be. Sometimes the cook tent ends up doubling as the bunkhouse depending on logistics and type of hunt. Let me say right off that MOST bears here in AK, at least where we roam, have very little if any contact with humans so tend to be much different than human climatized bears. I know of only one instance of a couple of juvenile brown bears (the worst kind, they're like a couple of teenage boys with too much time on their hands) that tore up a camp of ours. Sure you hear stories of different instances from all sorts of folks but one has to consider the source of these and sort the fly turds out of the pepper as it were. We ALWAYS have LOTS of firepower available, and handguns are pretty much left at home. The guns run from .338 on up to .458, and a very special little friend in pistol grip 12ga. for the brush etc. An old friend thats guides MANY fishing trips, has for 20+ years on the same river, deals with lots of bears during his summers due to good fishing means good salmon runs so there are lots of bruins about says "...and anyone is crazy if they think I'm going to stash the food anywhere but in the tent I'm sleeping in. I'm going to protect it because my livlihood depends on the fact that my fishermen need to be fed well and taken care of. Putting it anywhere else is just giving it away". This guy is EXTREMELY afraid of bears and wants nothing to do with them, yet he still retains that attitude. Crazy? Maybe but when you're partway through a long float trip or 100 miles from nowhere and fuzzybritches steals your grub, things can get interesting. So- Have I cooked in my tipi? You betcha. Do I sleep in it too? Yup. Will I continue to do so in the future? Sure will, and not think twice about it either. I cook outside when I can and feel like it but usually it's inside 'cause the weather is crummy and the wind will blow a tarp into the next GMU. I guess a lot of this may be irrelevant for your situation but hope some of it helps. Best regards to all, Oz May you not have bears in your camps nor find me nuttier than your grandmas holiday fruitcake!!!!!!


Essays